Downloads & Miscellanea

Valencia

  • PAcalculate

    Calculator, low impedancePAcalculate is a free multi-lingual multi-platform mobile app with calculators and other information and utilities for sound reinforcement and lighting professionals. PAcalculate is currently available for iOS (Apple), Android, Windows-Phone and Blackberry from their respective app stores (Symbian and WebOS can be provided on request). The application uses responsive design developed to work on screens as compact as a classic Blackberry as well as a large tablet screen. Both metric and English units are supported.

    PA related calculators include SPL, SPL addition, ceiling speaker coverage, air absorption, time to distance (and vice versa), frequency to wavelength (and vice versa) with full and half lambda options for arrays, Q factor to bandwidth conversion, dBu-dBV-Volts and cable losses (low and high impedance). For lighting, a DMX calculator as well and RGBW and CMY LED emulations are provided. All calculators provide comprehensive options as well as built-in help. Other calculators are not directly related to the industry, but will nonetheless be useful: Ohm's / Joule's Law, KVA, BPM to time and conversion of weighs and measures.

    In addition to calculators, pin assignment information is provided for some of the most common audio and lighting connectors. Lastly, an inclinometer utility rounds up the feature set.

    At the time of writing this, PAcalculate came with English, French, German, Portuguese, russian, Simplified Chinese and Spanish language sets. Thai is being worked on. I am seeking collaborative translations to other major languages (Arabic, Japanese, Korean, Italian, Hindi...). Please use this web's contact form if interested; it's only about 3 hours worth of work and we'll list your name in the main info screen of the app.

    Feature list:

    • Calculators
      • Audio
        • Acustics
          • SPL, SPL addition
          • Ceiling speaker coverage
          • Air absorption
          • Time «» distance (with temperature)
          • Frecuency «» wavelength (with temperature)

        • Electronics
          • dBu «» dBV «» V
          • Q factor «» bandwidth

        • Cabling
          • Speaker cable, low impedance
          • Speaker cable, high impedance (70/100V)

      • Lighting
        • DMX
        • RBG / RGBW / RGBA
        • CMY

      • Electricity
        • Ohm's Law / Joule 's Law

      • Music / recording
        • BPM » delay times

      • Weighs and measures
        • Weight, length, area and volume


    • Reference
      • Pin assignments
        • Audio
          • XLR, 1/4", DB25

        • Lighting
          • XLR3, XLR5

      • Graphs
        • Equal loudness contours (aka Fletcher&Munson)


    • Utilities
      • Inclinometer


    The app is lightweight (less than 2 Megs). Links (or simply search for "PAcalculate" in the app store of your phone):

  • Find us on FacebookWe'll be listening carefully to user feedback on PAcalculate. We've created a Facebook page (facebook.com/pacalculate) as an area for constructive discussions on current and future features

    Translation credits:

    Pierrick Saillant (French)
    Oliver Baumann (German)
    Anton Dudarev (Russian)


  • Red bass drum

    Shaped tone bursts are used to check maximum levels for individual frequency bands; they are also useful for evaluatating distortion performance and even polarity checking. Siegfried Linkwitz (yes, the same Linkwitz that goes with Riley) started using these pulses in the early 80s. Don Keele later refined the concept by defining the window that made the pulses be almost exactly one third-octave wide in frequency as well as developing composite bursts made up of bass frequency pulses. Tomlinson Holman (as in THX) would also advocate the use of tone bursts and incorporated them into his test disks for the Hollywood industry coining the term "boink tests".

    My contribution here takes the form of what I call "9-yard shaped tone bursts", a combination of third-octave band pulses spanning the complete audio spectrum and added together in a controlled way such that different shades or "colors" can be achieved such as white, pink or red (brownian). The illustration shows 131072-point FFT spectra of some of these full-range composite sinewave pulses in pink, red and EIA-426B (shown in yellow) "colours". Additionally, the "red bass drum" limits the "red" burst spectrum to 40 Hz on the low frequencies.

    9-yard sinewave bursts by Brusi Acoustics

    Out of these 9-yard bursts, the "red bass drum" (in Spanish, bombo rojo) can be downloaded from here ( 431K ,16 bit 44.1 kHz). Newer browsers with HTML5 support will also show a player. The file has been padded with silence up 5 seconds, for sensible looping. It is a kind of laboratory (yet highly musical) bass drum (except that it does not have harmonics as such, but all frequencies from 40 to 20k Hz, just like noise would), with a "red" shaped spectrum; we think this is a great signal for an instant all-round loudsèaker system check (play either left or right channel only).



    Creative Commons License (Red bass drum sound licensed under this Creative Commons License)



  • Whalebone & Idling spaceship

    While making some test sounds i wondered what a large bunch of logarithmically spaced tones spanning the audible band would sound like. As a synthesist, i have always enjoyed designing highly modulated sound textures using a music synthesizer. However, i never thought mathematically generated steady-state sounds could provide much liveliness, but here are whalebone and idling spaceship to prove me wrong.

    They are like the picket fence sound (same thing with one tone per 1/3rd octave band) on steroids.

    Using the same 1/24th octave resolution i often use for measurements, you get a highly modulated sound that i (following the picket fence analogy on an insired moment) named whale bone, since a whale's baleen (also referred to as "whale bone") is made up of an average of 260 plates, which happens to be extremely close to the 248 frequencies i use to cover the 1/3 octave bands from 20 to 20k Hz at 8 tones per 1/3rd octave bands, i.e. 24 tones per octave).

    The sound can be downloaded from here. For lightness,215K, it is presented in mono, using 8 bits and with a sampling frequency of 22 050 Hz (so there are tones to 11 kHz only). HTML5 capable browsers will show a player below.



    Along the same route we find idling spaceship. Here we increase the tone density and generate around 2000 tones up to 20 kHz. The result is a sound that develops over time and can be downloaded from here (646K, also 8-bit/22k Hz). Again, HTML5 capable browsers will show a player below.



    Those last two are probably useless "pink" coloured sounds, but I thought they were amusing.

    Creative Commons License (The two wave files above are licensed under this Creative Commons License)



  • Piston animations

    The animation below shows the directivity for a cone loudspeaker which has been simulated as a piston. The resulting radiation patterns come from Bessel functions, and can be seen to beam as frequency increases
    Piston animation. Cone directivity



    The animation below also shows the directivity for a cone loudspeaker which has been simulated as a piston, but is represented as 3D directivity balloons. Lobing is more clearly visible since a dB representation is used.
    Piston animation. Cone directivity baloons



  • Articles

    The following online versions of some of my articles can be found on the web:

    • Loudspeaker directivity, published by Sound and Video Contractor magazine (USA) in April 1999. The online version only contains partial text and does not include the numerous illustrations, but an updated version can be found here. PDF en español (original spartan PDF in Spanish)

    • The Power Alley published by Live Sound and LiveAudio.com / ProSoundweb.com in 2003. Ignore the Sound and Video Contractor version if you ever see it, as it contains nonsense the editor added. Left-right subwoofer interactions being inevitable and very apparent in outdoor applications, this one became a popular piece. Though the explanation for the power alley is far from being rocket science, this became a very popular piece, since for some reason nobody had actually sat down to extensively describe an effect that can be easily felt outdoors, probably partly because back subwoofer modelling was not available at the time (I had to use dimensional analysis and some custom speaker directivity and wireframe files). PDF en español (original spartan PDF in Spanish)

    • Electronic Versus Physical: An Analysis Of Shaping Array Directivity published by Live Sound and ProSoundweb.com in 2011. It explains why steering or arcing an array yields completely different results when done electronically (using delay) and physically. Case studies are provided to illustrate caveats for each depending on the application. PDF en español (original PDF in Spanish)


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